Mining in Sutton - Parts 76 to 87

 Part 76 - Mineworking in Sutton - This page describes the history of mineworking in Sutton township from when it was first mined in Sutton Heath about 1540. Figures discussed include Samuel Woods of the Lancashire Miners' Federation, who was born in Sutton, and publican Charles Heyes of the Locomotive Inn. The latter was also an engineer and he developed a safety device called the Provident Patent Safety Catch. Pits described include Sutton Heath, Ravenhead and Phoenix collieries and trade union disputes, including the 1926 strike and lockout, are also discussed.
  Part 77 - Sutton Manor Colliery Part 1 - The first in a two-part profile of the only St.Helens pit to be opened during the twentieth century and the last to close, dates from 1906 to 1959. The page contains details of Sutton Manor Colliery's development, mining accidents and industrial disputes including the 1926 strike and lock out. Note there are six accompanying Photo-Albums with over 250 pictures of the colliery.
  Part 78 - Sutton Manor Colliery Part 2 - This second in a two-part profile from 1960 to 1991, includes the opening of Sutton Manor Institute, the colliery's reorganisation in 1968, holidays to Russia, £14 million investment in 1983, electrification of no.1 pit's steam winder, 250 redundancies in 1986 and Sutton Manor Colliery's closure five years later. Note there are six accompanying Photo-Albums with over 250 pictures of the colliery.
  Part 79 - Clock Face Colliery Part 1 - Documenting its history from 1890 to 1966, these pages describe the colliery managers, mining accidents, opening of Clock Face Institute in 1914, mining practices, 1926 strike / lock out, Clock Face Colliery carnivals, sports & band, opening of the pit-head baths in 1939, its role in the 1948 Berlin airlift and final closure in 1966.
  Part 80 - Clock Face Colliery Part 2 - Documenting its history from 1890 to 1966, these pages describe the colliery managers, mining accidents, opening of Clock Face Institute in 1914, mining practices, 1926 strike / lock out, Clock Face Colliery carnivals, sports & band, opening of the pit-head baths in 1939, its role in the 1948 Berlin airlift and final closure in 1966.
  Part 81 - Bold Colliery Part 1 - This is the first in a two-part history of the colliery, covering the years 1875 until 1955. The page documents in great detail the many mining accidents at Bold, including the cage disaster of 1905 that cost 4 boys and a collier their lives. It also profiles manager Andrew Jackson and describes how in 1940, Bold miner Carl Schofield and colliery agent Thomas Jameson were both awarded the Edward Medal for saving five men.
  Part 82 - Bold Colliery Part 2 - This second part covers the developments at the colliery from 1955 to 1991 and describes the improvements in technology and practice. The adjacent Bold Power Station is featured in detail and a section of the page relates how surface superintendent Harry Simmons put steam locos back to work at the colliery. When these were replaced by diesel locos in 1982, Railway World magazine dubbed it "the effective demise of industrial steam" in Britain.
  Part 83 - Bold Power Station - This page is devoted to the history of Bold Power Station, which was a major customer of Bold Colliery. It also discusses the process of generating electricity, with many images sourced from the power station's own promotional booklet. Thanks to Peter Jenner, former Control Engineer and Station Efficiency Engineer at Bold, for his assistance.
  Part 84 - Lea Green Colliery - This page describes the history of the colliery off Lowfield Lane from its opening during the early 1870s by James Radley until its closure in 1964. It documents the many deaths of men and boys as young as 13, who worked at the colliery's three pits. Lea Green miner and Manchester United star player Bill Foulkes is also featured and the page includes 20 photographs.
  Part 85 - Sherdley Colliery - A history of the colliery, which was situated on the western side of Marshalls Cross Road, off Broadgate Avenue, and which mined coal from the 1870s until 1944. The 5000-word page features ten images and includes details of the colliery’s many accidents, which led to at least 46 deaths.
  Part 86 - Research Sources & Bibliography - Most of the research for this website has come from the owner studying thousands of newspapers from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. However other sources have been used and this page details the books and other publications that have been studied and credits those who have kindly given assistance.
This website is written and researched by Stephen R. Wainwright ©MMXVI  Contact Me
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